The Princess and Curdie

The Princess and Curdie

Paperback(Reissue)

$6.99 View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Monday, September 23

Overview

1873 sequel to an enduring children's book, The Princess & The Goblin.<

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140367621
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 08/01/1996
Series: Puffin Classics Series
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 222,321
Product dimensions: 5.06(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.67(d)
Lexile: 1120L (what's this?)
Age Range: 10 - 12 Years

About the Author

George MacDonald (1824-1905) was a minister who was rejected by his congregation, and struggled thereafter to support his family of eleven children by writing. In his own day he was celebrated as poet, preacher, and lecturer, and as the author of numerous novels. He is best known today for his vivid children's stories. U. C. Knoepflmacher has published widely on children's literature and the Victorian period.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Princess and Curdie 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 597 reviews.
memueller More than 1 year ago
The story is wonderful: full of delight, thoughtfulness, depth, engaging story, character development and emotional touchstones. HOWEVER--- this particular edition is terrible! The formatting is atrocious! There are hardly any margins, which makes it very hard to hold open to read, not to mention hard on the eyes. The font isn't the easiest to read, either. The illustrations are very nice, which is one reason I bought this edition, but there is no mention anywhere in the book of the illustrator's name. It feels like a cheaply made book. I wish I had bought a different edition. I would send this one back, but I have already opened it too far (I had a book club meeting that I had to read it for).
Guest More than 1 year ago
MacDonald is a master storyteller, though his books are sometimes hard to find! Make sure you read the book before it, 'The Princess and the Goblin', too!
ncgraham on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Now that I¿ve reread both of George MacDonald¿s novels featuring the little princess and the intrepid miner boy, I understand why they are often referred to as the ¿Curdie books,¿ and almost never the ¿Princess books¿ or ¿Irene books.¿ While these two characters share the spotlight pretty equally in The Princess and the Goblin, The Princess and Curdie barely involves the Princess at all.The story opens a couple years after the terrible adventure in which the goblins tried to carry off Irene. All of the nasty creatures have either perished or fled, and Irene herself is living with her father in his far-off city. Curdie is still living with his parents on the mountain, and mining in the caves beneath it. He sometimes doubts the truth of his previous adventures, and is beginning to grow rather dull and ordinary, until the princess¿ great-great grandmother brings him to his senses by allowing him to accidentally shoot one of her doves. She then sends him on a quest for the king¿s city, and chooses as his companion a fearsome, horrible-looking beast named Lina. He does not even know what he is to do when he is to get there, except that he is meant to serve his old friends in some way.The Princess and Curdie was written a whole decade after its predecessor, and it¿s easy to see that the author¿s style matured greatly over time, although whether it was for the better or the worse is up to the reader. If I were to liken each to pieces of art, the first book would be a light and airy sketch, stretching from the pinnacles of the mountains down to the bowels where its cartoonish inhabitants live; any color would be provided by the gentle application of watercolors. The second, on the other hand, would be an elaborate oil painting with layer dabbed upon layer, until the canvas is heavy with colors both rich and dark.As a result, there are some moments in this book that are absolutely beautiful, for instance this description, which points tellingly to the aesthetic MacDonald tried to achieve in his adult fantasy works:A mountain is a strange and awful thing. In old times, without knowing so much of their strangeness and awfulness as we do, people were yet more afraid of mountains. But then somehow they had not come to see how beautiful they are as well as awful, and they hated them&mdash;and what people hate they must fear. Now that we have learned to look at them with admiration, perhaps we do not always feel quite awe enough of them. To me they are beautiful terrors.A bit confused in places perhaps, but the phrase ¿beautiful terrors¿ is definitely a key one for MacDonald¿s oeuvre. And then there is this passage, by far my favorite from either Curdie book:There is a difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. One of the latter sort comes at length to know at once whether a thing is true the moment it comes before him; one of the former class grows more and more afraid of being taken in, so afraid of it he takes himself in altogether, and comes at length to believe in nothing but his dinner: to be sure of a thing with him is to have it between his teeth.At the beginning of the book, Curdie is in a fair way towards becoming one of this latter sort, but his remorse at killing one of the old princess¿ dove brings him back to himself, and leads him on the path of ¿continuous resurrection.¿ MacDonald¿s characterization is here at its best, and Curdie seems somehow older in these opening chapters than he does in the rest of the book: it¿s rather disappointing to read on, for in certain ways the style and characterization become more childish as the book continues, although they always remain distinctly ¿older¿ than they were in The Princess and the Goblin.As another downside, it must be admitted that the ¿heaviness¿ I spoke of in reference to the tone of this book fully applies
fyrefly98 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Summary: After the goblin's evil plans have been defeated, the king takes Princess Irene away from the mountains, where Curdie is left behind to tend the mines with his father. Irene's magical great-great-grandmother stays behind, however, and soon sets Curdie on a path towards the city, for something is going horribly wrong in the kingdom... something that only Curdie can set right.Review: Meh. This book followed more of a straightforward storyline than did the first book - essentially a standard adventure-quest story. But it lacked some of the charm of the first book, and it didn't grab my attention in the way that I hoped it would. I think part of my problem was in its strangely inconsistent morality, especially in regards to violence. Curdie, with his miner's mattock, does a fair amount of damage to people, animals and property, and Lina, the strange ugly semi-dog that he picks up as a companion, is pretty vicious in parts. There's a fair amount of leg-breaking, and finger-biting-off, and even killing by the protagonists, which is treated as a-okay, because Curdie is pure of heart (as heroes are wont to be), so it's right and proper that he subdue the bad guys however he must. The ending is similarly strange; giving us the expected fairy-tale happy ending... and then continuing for an additional page about how things turned to crap and corruption after the happy ending. I guess I couldn't get a handle on when (if ever) the story was being tongue-in-cheek, and if it was being serious, what point it was trying to make. 2 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: Most of the action is independent of the events of The Princess and the Goblin, so it could be read independently, but on its own merits I wouldn't rank it very high on anybody's must-read list, unless Victorian children's lit is a particular passion of theirs.
MickyFine on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In the sequel to The Princess and the Goblin, Curdie has continued to work in the king's mines after the departure of Princess Irene to the palace. But when a threat emerges to kingdom, Irene's great-great-grandmother calls Curdie to her, and after bestowing him with a gift, sends him to the king's palace where he works to correct the evils that have befallen the kingdom.MacDonald's novel is an allegory first and foremost. While the plot is intriguing and Curdie's development as an individual is interesting, it is MacDonald's exploration of morality that makes the book a worthwhile reading experience. Of course, the narrative itself has the distinct feel of a fairy tale and would appeal to children, but it does have language that shows the book's age. The descriptions however, are delightfully rich. A read that is fun as an intellectual exercise but also a delightful children's novel. However, be warned that the last page and a half gives the book a distinctly unhappy ending, after the expected happy ending for the characters.
RRHowell on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a George MacDonald book that kids can read or enjoy having it read to them. Is it, as someone else said about one of his other books "moralizing fluff"? Well, yes. But of that genre, it is a lovely example. MacDonald's books make you want to be good, instead of telling you you ought to be good.
davegregg on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This sequel to "The Princess and the Goblin" starts a little oddly (though the discussion of the mountains is beautiful), but it develops into a wonderful and rich tale."The Princess and Curdie" picks up about a year after the events of "The Princess and the Goblin." It starts a new adventure, while remaining firmly a part of the story of the first book. I read the second book immediately after finishing the first, so I can't quite imagine appreciating it as much without the history I feel with the characters, the places, the mythology, and the themes that "The Princess and the Goblin" gave me.Remember that MacDonald wrote allegorically. These, as well as many of his other fictional works, were intended to be appreciated not only for the sake of the story itself, but also for the moral, philosophical, and even theological lessons the story promotes. Remembering that will explain, for example, why "The Princess and Curdie" ends the way it does. Part of the ending I loved and anticipated eagerly (I won't spoil it) and part disappointed me. But no doubt MacDonald intended the reader to be disappointed. It's instructional and will be clear when you finish.I don't give out many five-star ratings. That is how much I enjoyed this book!
KangarooRat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the better old-fashioned children's books, MacDonald has a way with words.
Annisa More than 1 year ago
Love the story, but the digitization is horrible
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was great. I found it a little hard to understand some of the phrases and wording, but I got the main point of the book. The only thing that made me take off the 5th star was the second half of the last chapter. The hole book seamed to be about setting things right, but at the very end of the last chapter, the plot takes a twist and everything that had been set right falls even farther apart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago