Lilith

Lilith

by George MacDonald

Paperback

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Overview

Introduction by C. S. Lewis

"Lilith is equal if not superior to the best of Poe," wrote W. H. Auden in his introduction to the 1954 reprint of George MacDonald’s Lilith, which was first published in 1895.

It is the story of Mr. Vane, an orphan and heir to a large house—a house in which he has a vision that leads him through a large old mirror into another world. In chronicling the five trips Mr. Vane makes to this other world, MacDonald hauntingly explores the ultimate mystery of evil.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781515181095
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 07/21/2015
Pages: 110
Sales rank: 444,540
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.26(d)

About the Author

George MacDonald (1824 - 1905) was a Scottish author, poet and Christian minister. He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll. C. S. Lewis wrote that he regarded MacDonald as his "master": "Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train-station bookstall, I began to read. A few hours later," said Lewis, "I knew that I had crossed a great frontier." G. K. Chesterton cited The Princess and the Goblin as a book that had "made a difference to my whole existence".

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Lilith 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 591 reviews.
Holy-Quest More than 1 year ago
C.S. Lewis referred to George MacDonald as "his master." That's quite a compliment coming from an author as world-renowned and loved as C.S. Lewis. (It was my appreciation for Lewis and his appreciation for MacDonald that led me to begin reading MacDonald's works.) C.S. Lewis was not the only writer who was inspired by MacDonald; Lewis Carroll, W.H. Auden, G.K Chesterton, Mark Twain, Madeleine L'Engle, J.R.R. Tolkien, and E. Nesbit were also influenced by MacDonald's writing. Lilith is one of MacDonald's most intriguing, profound, and imaginative works. The story of Lilith is other-worldly, taking place in another dimension of time and space, but it reads more like a fantasy than a science-fiction novel. MacDonald takes stories of creation, myth, and death, and blends them all into a remarkable tale. The thread of this tale seems to wander, almost aimlessly at times, until the master-weaver sews it all together at the end for the reader. MacDonald's style of writing is not always easy for 21st century readers, but it is well-worth the effort. What I love most about MacDonald's romantic fantasies are the beautiful images he paints, the interwoven sub-plots, and the deep truths that under-gird his stories. His meandering style (mentioned above) helps me to lose myself in the story rather than trying to guess at where he might be going with every twist or turn. I also like the fact that you never really leave his stories behind. Instead, you go on thinking about them, returning to them, wondering and wandering about them. MacDonald's protagonists are continually stepping into and out of the present, everyday world and the fantastic, extraordinary other-world. I find this simply fascinating. If you are like stories that rich in imagination, you're likely to enjoy Lilith. (If you wish to add this book to your home library, I like the ones published by Johannesen best. They have a lovely binding and are facsimiles of the original printing. If you prefer paperback, then I recommend Eerdmans because they include C.S. Lewis' introduction.)
Anonymous 8 months ago
i+didn%27t+care+for+it+%F0%9F%98%95
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This 1895 book was recommended in A Reader's Guide to Fantasy's "Seven-League Bookshelf"--a list of 30-odd books considered the "cream" of the genre. Dante's Divine Comedy is mentioned in the book and I can see similarities with not just Dante but works of Carroll and Lewis. Macdonald was a close friend of Lewis Carroll and saw Alice in Wonderland in manuscript; C.S. Lewis greatly admired Macdonald and named him as one of his most important influences. As with Carroll's Through the Looking Glass and Lewis' Narnia, the narrator of this story steps into another world through an ordinary piece of furniture--in this case a mirror--and there are animal characters, notably a talking raven and a leopard. As with Narnia and the Divine Comedy, this is essentially a work of Christian Fiction, even more allegorical than Narnia as dealing like Dante with the landscape of the afterlife. Although given Macdonald's Universalist beliefs, there is no eternal hell--someday all will find salvation, though in Macdonald's conception it won't be easy.I can't quite say I really liked this. I'd say this hovers between a two and a three star. On one hand, I made it through to the end, it has interesting ideas and historical importance in the fantasy genre. On the other hand, I often found this dull, no characters captured my sympathy or imagination and this just didn't strike me as an outstanding example of the kind of book it exemplifies. This doesn't have the humor, whimsy, wit or charm of Through the Looking Glass or Narnia or the prodigious imagination, unity, beautiful language and architecture of The Divine Comedy. I can't imagine I'll ever reread this, and I just can't see this as being in the same league as Dante, Carroll or Lewis.
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