Fables and Fairy Tales: Aesop's Fables, Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, Grimm's Fairy Tales, and The Blue Fairy Book

Fables and Fairy Tales: Aesop's Fables, Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, Grimm's Fairy Tales, and The Blue Fairy Book

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Overview

Four timeless anthologies of cherished fables, fairy tales, and bedtime stories from Aesop, Hans Christian Andersen, the Brothers Grimm, and Andrew Lang.
 
The most enchanting stories of childhood are included in this sweeping collection. These are the classic tales—of princes and princesses, monsters and magic, enchanted forests and fantastic creatures—that have thrilled readers around the world for generations.
 
Aesop’s Fables: In ancient Greece, a storyteller named Aesop captivated his listeners with tales both beautiful and instructive. From “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” to “The Tortoise and the Hare,” his fables retain the power to guide and entertain.
 
Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales: Inspired by ancient Danish legends as well as Arabian Nights, Andersen’s classic stories—including “The Emperor’s New Clothes” and “The Snow Queen” (the basis for Frozen)—are composed with a directness that children and adults still find refreshing.
 
The Brothers Grimm: From “Rapunzel” to “Hansel and Gretel” to “Little Red Riding Hood,” the German folktales the Brothers Grimm brought to the world’s attention have become part of the very fabric of our culture.
 
The Blue Fairy Book: Originally published in 1889, this first volume of Andrew Lang’s renowned Fairy Books includes such favorites as “Beauty and the Beast,” “Puss in Boots,” “Aladdin,” and “Jack the Giant-Killer.”
 
To read these stories is to be transported to a realm of imagination. Here, the most important life lessons are imparted through the irresistible magic of storytelling.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781504047692
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 09/05/2017
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 2155
Sales rank: 256,992
File size: 6 MB
Age Range: 6 - 11 Years

About the Author

Hans Christian Andersen (1805–1875) was a Danish poet and author. Born to a shoemaker and a washerwoman, Andersen worked as an actor and a tailor’s apprentice before becoming a writer. Although he wrote many plays, novels, poems, and travelogues, Andersen is best known for his fairy tales. His birthday, April 2, is celebrated as International Children’s Book Day. 
 
The Brothers Grimm, Jacob (1785–1863) and Wilhelm (1786–1859), were scholars best known for their lifelong dedication to collecting and publishing ancient German folk tales. Their groundbreaking Kinder- und Hausmärchen (Children’s and Household Tales) was published in seven different editions between 1812 and 1857 and brought to the world’s attention such unforgettable characters as Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, Rapunzel, and Snow White. 
 
According to legend, Aesop (620–564 BCE) spent much of his early life as a slave before earning his freedom with cleverness. No trace of his original writings survives, but Aesop’s fables were transcribed by others and passed down through the ages. In 1484 the first printed edition spurred a wave of translations around the world. Today his tales of moral instruction are some of the most cherished stories in the world.
 
Andrew Lang (1844-1912) was a Scottish scholar and writer, best known for his folklore and mythological tales. After college, he moved to London and began working as a journalist. He began collecting fairytales and folklore stories for his first collection, The Blue Fairy Book. The Fairy Books contained hundreds of pages of folklore stories, which Lang edited while his wife helped translate. Receiving acclaim, the books totaled in 427 stories combined in twelve collections. Lang also produced his own original writing, including novels, literary criticism, and poetry, but his work did not attain the same literary recognition.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

THE FOX AND THE GRAPES

A hungry Fox saw some fine bunches of Grapes hanging from a vine that was trained along a high trellis, and did his best to reach them by jumping as high as he could into the air. But it was all in vain, for they were just out of reach: so he gave up trying, and walked away with an air of dignity and unconcern, remarking, "I thought those Grapes were ripe, but I see now they are quite sour."

THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGGS

A Man and his Wife had the good fortune to possess a Goose which laid a Golden Egg every day. Lucky though they were, they soon began to think they were not getting rich fast enough, and, imagining the bird must be made of gold inside, they decided to kill it in order to secure the whole store of precious metal at once. But when they cut it open they found it was just like any other goose. Thus, they neither got rich all at once, as they had hoped, nor enjoyed any longer the daily addition to their wealth.

THE CAT AND THE MICE

There was once a house that was overrun with Mice. A Cat heard of this, and said to herself, "That's the place for me," and off she went and took up her quarters in the house, and caught the Mice one by one and ate them. At last the Mice could stand it no longer, and they determined to take to their holes and stay there. "That's awkward," said the Cat to herself: "the only thing to do is to coax them out by a trick." So she considered a while, and then climbed up the wall and let herself hang down by her hind legs from a peg, and pretended to be dead. By and by a Mouse peeped out and saw the Cat hanging there. "Aha!" it cried, "you're very clever, madam, no doubt: but you may turn yourself into a bag of meal hanging there, if you like, yet you won't catch us coming anywhere near you."

THE MISCHIEVOUS DOG

There was once a Dog who used to snap at people and bite them without any provocation, and who was a great nuisance to every one who came to his master's house. So his master fastened a bell round his neck to warn people of his presence. The Dog was very proud of the bell, and strutted about tinkling it with immense satisfaction. But an old dog came up to him and said, "The fewer airs you give yourself the better, my friend. You don't think, do you, that your bell was given you as a reward of merit? On the contrary, it is a badge of disgrace."

THE CHARCOAL-BURNER AND THE FULLER

There was once a Charcoal-burner who lived and worked by himself. A Fuller, however, happened to come and settle in the same neighbourhood; and the Charcoal-burner, having made his acquaintance and finding he was an agreeable sort of fellow, asked him if he would come and share his house: "We shall get to know one another better that way," he said, "and, beside, our household expenses will be diminished." The Fuller thanked him, but replied, "I couldn't think of it, sir: why, everything I take such pains to whiten would be blackened in no time by your charcoal."

THE MICE IN COUNCIL

Once upon a time all the Mice met together in Council, and discussed the best means of securing themselves against the attacks of the cat. After several suggestions had been debated, a Mouse of some standing and experience got up and said, "I think I have hit upon a plan which will ensure our safety in the future, provided you approve and carry it out. It is that we should fasten a bell round the neck of our enemy the cat, which will by its tinkling warn us of her approach." This proposal was warmly applauded, and it had been already decided to adopt it, when an old Mouse got upon his feet and said, "I agree with you all that the plan before us is an admirable one: but may I ask who is going to bell the cat?"

THE BAT AND THE WEASELS

A Bat fell to the ground and was caught by a Weasel, and was just going to be killed and eaten when it begged to be let go. The Weasel said he couldn't do that because he was an enemy of all birds on principle. "Oh, but," said the Bat, "I'm not a bird at all: I'm a mouse." "So you are," said the Weasel, "now I come to look at you"; and he let it go. Some time after this the Bat was caught in just the same way by another Weasel, and, as before, begged for its life. "No," said the Weasel, "I never let a mouse go by any chance." "But I'm not a mouse," said the Bat; "I'm a bird." "Why, so you are," said the Weasel; and he too let the Bat go.

THE DOG AND THE SOW

A Dog and a Sow were arguing and each claimed that its own young ones were finer than those of any other animal. "Well," said the Sow at last, "mine can see, at any rate, when they come into the world: but yours are born blind."

THE FOX AND THE CROW

A Crow was sitting on a branch of a tree with a piece of cheese in her beak when a Fox observed her and set his wits to work to discover some way of getting the cheese. Coming and standing under the tree he looked up and said, "What a noble bird I see above me! Her beauty is without equal, the hue of her plumage exquisite. If only her voice is as sweet as her looks are fair, she ought without doubt to be Queen of the Birds." The Crow was hugely flattered by this, and just to show the Fox that she could sing she gave a loud caw. Down came the cheese, of course, and the Fox, snatching it up, said, "You have a voice, madam, I see: what you want is wits."

THE HORSE AND THE GROOM

There was once a Groom who used to spend long hours clipping and combing the Horse of which he had charge, but who daily stole a portion of his allowance of oats, and sold it for his own profit. The Horse gradually got into worse and worse condition, and at last cried to the Groom, "If you really want me to look sleek and well, you must comb me less and feed me more."

THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

A Wolf came upon a Lamb straying from the flock, and felt some compunction about taking the life of so helpless a creature without some plausible excuse; so he cast about for a grievance and said at last, "Last year, sirrah, you grossly insulted me." "That is impossible, sir," bleated the Lamb, "for I wasn't born then." "Well," retorted the Wolf, "you feed in my pastures." "That cannot be," replied the Lamb, "for I have never yet tasted grass." "You drink from my spring, then," continued the Wolf. "Indeed, sir," said the poor Lamb, "I have never yet drunk anything but my mother's milk." "Well, anyhow," said the Wolf, "I'm not going without my dinner": and he sprang upon the Lamb and devoured it without more ado.

THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE

A Peacock taunted a Crane with the dullness of her plumage. "Look at my brilliant colours," said she, "and see how much finer they are than your poor feathers." "I am not denying," replied the Crane, "that yours are far gayer than mine; but when it comes to flying I can soar into the clouds, whereas you are confined to the earth like any dunghill cock."

THE CAT AND THE BIRDS

A Cat heard that the Birds in an aviary were ailing. So he got himself up as a doctor, and, taking with him a set of the instruments proper to his profession, presented himself at the door, and inquired after the health of the Birds. "We shall do very well," they replied, without letting him in, "when we've seen the last of you."

THE SPENDTHRIFT AND THE SWALLOW

A Spendthrift, who had wasted his fortune, and had nothing left but the clothes in which he stood, saw a Swallow one fine day in early spring. Thinking that summer had come, and that he could now do without his coat, he went and sold it for what it would fetch. A change, however, took place in the weather, and there came a sharp frost which killed the unfortunate Swallow. When the Spendthrift saw its dead body he cried, "Miserable bird! Thanks to you I am perishing of cold myself."

THE OLD WOMAN AND THE DOCTOR

An Old Woman became almost totally blind from a disease of the eyes, and, after consulting a Doctor, made an agreement with him in the presence of witnesses that she should pay him a high fee if he cured her, while if he failed he was to receive nothing. The Doctor accordingly prescribed a course of treatment, and every time he paid her a visit he took away with him some article out of the house, until at last, when he visited her for the last time, and the cure was complete, there was nothing left. When the Old Woman saw that the house was empty she refused to pay him his fee; and, after repeated refusals on her part, he sued her before the magistrates for payment of her debt. On being brought into court she was ready with her defence. "The claimant," said she, "has stated the facts about our agreement correctly. I undertook to pay him a fee if he cured me, and he, on his part, promised to charge nothing if he failed. Now, he says I am cured; but I say that I am blinder than ever, and I can prove what I say. When my eyes were bad I could at any rate see well enough to be aware that my house contained a certain amount of furniture and other things; but now, when according to him I am cured, I am entirely unable to see anything there at all."

THE MOON AND HER MOTHER

The Moon once begged her Mother to make her a gown. "How can I?" replied she; "there's no fitting your figure. At one time you're a New Moon, and at another you're a Full Moon; and between whiles you're neither one nor the other."

MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN

A Woodman was felling a tree on the bank of a river, when his axe, glancing off the trunk, flew out of his hands and fell into the water. As he stood by the water's edge lamenting his loss, Mercury appeared and asked him the reason for his grief; and on learning what had happened, out of pity for his distress he dived into the river and, bringing up a golden axe, asked him if that was the one he had lost. The Woodman replied that it was not, and Mercury then dived a second time, and, bringing up a silver axe, asked if that was his. "No, that is not mine either," said the Woodman. Once more Mercury dived into the river, and brought up the missing axe. The Woodman was overjoyed at recovering his property, and thanked his benefactor warmly; and the latter was so pleased with his honesty that he made him a present of the other two axes. When the Woodman told the story to his companions, one of these was filled with envy of his good fortune and determined to try his luck for himself. So he went and began to fell a tree at the edge of the river, and presently contrived to let his axe drop into the water. Mercury appeared as before, and, on learning that his axe had fallen in, he dived and brought up a golden axe, as he had done on the previous occasion. Without waiting to be asked whether it was his or not the fellow cried, "That's mine, that's mine," and stretched out his hand eagerly for the prize: but Mercury was so disgusted at his dishonesty that he not only declined to give him the golden axe, but also refused to recover for him the one he had let fall into the stream.

THE ASS, THE FOX, AND THE LION

An Ass and a Fox went into partnership and sallied out to forage for food together. They hadn't gone far before they saw a Lion coming their way, at which they were both dreadfully frightened. But the Fox thought he saw a way of saving his own skin, and went boldly up to the Lion and whispered in his ear, "I'll manage that you shall get hold of the Ass without the trouble of stalking him, if you'll promise to let me go free." The Lion agreed to this, and the Fox then rejoined his companion and contrived before long to lead him by a hidden pit, which some hunter had dug as a trap for wild animals, and into which he fell. When the Lion saw that the Ass was safely caught and couldn't get away, it was to the Fox that he first turned his attention, and he soon finished him off, and then at his leisure proceeded to feast upon the Ass.

THE LION AND THE MOUSE

A Lion asleep in his lair was waked up by a Mouse running over his face. Losing his temper he seized it with his paw and was about to kill it. The Mouse, terrified, piteously entreated him to spare its life. "Please let me go," it cried, "and one day I will repay you for your kindness." The idea of so insignificant a creature ever being able to do anything for him amused the Lion so much that he laughed aloud, and good-humouredly let it go. But the Mouse's chance came, after all. One day the Lion got entangled in a net which had been spread for game by some hunters, and the Mouse heard and recognised his roars of anger and ran to the spot. Without more ado it set to work to gnaw the ropes with its teeth, and succeeded before long in setting the Lion free. "There!" said the Mouse, "you laughed at me when I promised I would repay you: but now you see, even a Mouse can help a Lion."

THE CROW AND THE PITCHER

A thirsty Crow found a Pitcher with some water in it, but so little was there that, try as she might, she could not reach it with her beak, and it seemed as though she would die of thirst within sight of the remedy. At last she hit upon a clever plan. She began dropping pebbles into the Pitcher, and with each pebble the water rose a little higher until at last it reached the brim, and the knowing bird was enabled to quench her thirst.

THE BOYS AND THE FROGS

Some mischievous Boys were playing on the edge of a pond, and, catching sight of some Frogs swimming about in the shallow water, they began to amuse themselves by pelting them with stones, and they killed several of them. At last one of the Frogs put his head out of the water and said, "Oh, stop! stop! I beg of you: what is sport to you is death to us."

THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN

A dispute arose between the North Wind and the Sun, each claiming that he was stronger than the other. At last they agreed to try their powers upon a traveller, to see which could soonest strip him of his cloak. The North Wind had the first try; and, gathering up all his force for the attack, he came whirling furiously down upon the man, and caught up his cloak as though he would wrest it from him by one single effort: but the harder he blew, the more closely the man wrapped it round himself. Then came the turn of the Sun. At first he beamed gently upon the traveller, who soon unclasped his cloak and walked on with it hanging loosely about his shoulders: then he shone forth in his full strength, and the man, before he had gone many steps, was glad to throw his cloak right off and complete his journey more lightly clad.

THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS

A Widow, thrifty and industrious, had two servants, whom she kept pretty hard at work. They were not allowed to lie long abed in the mornings, but the old lady had them up and doing as soon as the cock crew. They disliked intensely having to get up at such an hour, especially in winter-time: and they thought that if it were not for the cock waking up their Mistress so horribly early, they could sleep longer. So they caught it and wrung its neck. But they weren't prepared for the consequences. For what happened was that their Mistress, not hearing the cock crow as usual, waked them up earlier than ever, and set them to work in the middle of the night.

THE GOODS AND THE ILLS

There was a time in the youth of the world when Goods and Ills entered equally into the concerns of men, so that the Goods did not prevail to make them altogether blessed, nor the Ills to make them wholly miserable. But owing to the foolishness of mankind the Ills multiplied greatly in number and increased in strength, until it seemed as though they would deprive the Goods of all share in human affairs, and banish them from the earth. The latter, therefore, betook themselves to heaven and complained to Jupiter of the treatment they had received, at the same time praying him to grant them protection from the Ills, and to advise them concerning the manner of their intercourse with men. Jupiter granted their request for protection, and decreed that for the future they should not go among men openly in a body, and so be liable to attack from the hostile Ills, but singly and unobserved, and at infrequent and unexpected intervals. Hence it is that the earth is full of Ills, for they come and go as they please and are never far away; while Goods, alas! come one by one only, and have to travel all the way from heaven, so that they are very seldom seen.

THE HARES AND THE FROGS

The Hares once gathered together and lamented the unhappiness of their lot, exposed as they were to dangers on all sides and lacking the strength and the courage to hold their own. Men, dogs, birds and beasts of prey were all their enemies, and killed and devoured them daily: and sooner than endure such persecution any longer, they one and all determined to end their miserable lives. Thus resolved and desperate, they rushed in a body towards a neighbouring pool, intending to drown themselves. On the bank were sitting a number of Frogs, who, when they heard the noise of the Hares as they ran, with one accord leaped into the water and hid themselves in the depths. Then one of the older Hares who was wiser than the rest cried out to his companions, "Stop, my friends, take heart; don't let us destroy ourselves after all: see, here are creatures who are afraid of us, and who must, therefore, be still more timid than ourselves."

(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Fables and Fairy Tales"
by .
Copyright © 2017 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc..
Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

  • Aesop’s Fables
    • Title Page
    • Introduction
    • The Fox and the Grapes
    • The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs
    • The Cat and the Mice
    • The Mischievous Dog
    • The Charcoal-Burner and the Fuller
    • The Mice in Council
    • The Bat and the Weasels
    • The Dog and the Sow
    • The Fox and the Crow
    • The Horse and the Groom
    • The Wolf and the Lamb
    • The Peacock and the Crane
    • The Cat and the Birds
    • The Spendthrift and the Swallow
    • The Old Woman and the Doctor
    • The Moon and Her Mother
    • Mercury and the Woodman
    • The Ass, the Fox, and the Lion
    • The Lion and the Mouse
    • The Crow and the Pitcher
    • The Boys and the Frogs
    • The North Wind and the Sun
    • The Mistress and Her Servants
    • The Goods and the Ills
    • The Hares and the Frogs
    • The Fox and the Stork
    • The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing
    • The Stag in the Ox-Stall
    • The Milkmaid and Her Pail
    • The Dolphins, the Whales, and the Sprat
    • The Fox and the Monkey
    • The Ass and the Lap-Dog
    • The Fir-Tree and the Bramble
    • The Frogs’ Complaint Against the Sun
    • The Dog, the Cock, and the Fox
    • The Gnat and the Bull
    • The Bear and the Travellers
    • The Slave and the Lion
    • The Flea and the Man
    • The Bee and Jupiter
    • The Oak and the Reeds
    • The Blind Man and the Cub
    • The Boy and the Snails
    • The Apes and the Two Travellers
    • The Ass and His Burdens
    • The Shepherd’s Boy ant the Wolf
    • The Fox and the Goat
    • The Fisherman and the Sprat
    • The Boasting Traveller
    • The Crab and His Mother
    • The Ass and His Shadow
    • The Farmer and His Sons
    • The Dog and the Cook
    • The Monkey As King
    • The Thieves and the Cock
    • The Farmer and Fortune
    • Jupiter and the Monkey
    • Father and Sons
    • The Lamp
    • The Owl and the Birds
    • The Ass in the Lion’s Skin
    • The She-Goats and Their Beards
    • The Old Lion
    • The Boy Bathing
    • The Quack Frog
    • The Swollen Fox
    • The Mouse, the Frog, and the Hawk
    • The Boy and the Nettles
    • The Peasant and the Apple-Tree
    • The Jackdaw and the Pigeons
    • Jupiter and the Tortoise
    • The Dog in the Manger
    • The Two Bags
    • The Oxen and the Axletrees
    • The Boy and the Filberts
    • The Frogs Asking for a King
    • The Olive-Tree and the Fig-Tree
    • The Lion and the Boar
    • The Walnut-Tree
    • The Man and the Lion
    • The Tortoise and the Eagle
    • The Kid on the Housetop
    • The Fox Without a Tail
    • The Vain Jackdaw
    • The Traveller and His Dog
    • The Shipwrecked Man and the Sea
    • The Wild Boar and the Fox
    • Mercury and the Sculptor
    • The Fawn and His Mother
    • The Fox and the Lion
    • The Eagle and His Captor
    • The Blacksmith and His Dog
    • The Stag at the Pool
    • The Dog and His Shadow
    • Mercury and the Tradesmen
    • The Mice and the Weasels
    • The Peacock and Juno
    • The Bear and the Fox
    • The Ass and the Old Peasant
    • The Ox and the Frog
    • The Man and the Image
    • Hercules and the Waggoner
    • The Pomegranate, the Apple-Tree, and the Bramble
    • The Lion, the Bear, and the Fox
    • The Blackamoor
    • The Two Soldiers and the Robber
    • The Lion and the Wild Ass
    • The Man and the Satyr
    • The Image-Seller
    • The Eagle and the Arrow
    • The Rich Man and the Tanner
    • The Wolf, the Mother, and Her Child
    • The Old Woman and the Wine-Jar
    • The Lioness and the Vixen
    • The Viper and the File
    • The Cat and the Cock
    • The Hare and the Tortoise
    • The Soldier and His Horse
    • The Oxen and the Butchers
    • The Wolf and the Lion
    • The Sheep, the Wolf, and the Stag
    • The Lion and the Three Bulls
    • The Horse and His Rider
    • The Goat and the Vine
    • The Two Pots
    • The Old Hound
    • The Clown and the Countryman
    • The Lark and the Farmer
    • The Lion and the Ass
    • The Prophet
    • The Hound and the Hare
    • The Lion, the Mouse, and the Fox
    • The Trumpeter Taken Prisoner
    • The Wolf and the Crane
    • The Eagle, the Cat, and the Wild Sow
    • The Wolf and the Sheep
    • The Tunny-Fish and the Dolphin
    • The Three Tradesmen
    • The Mouse and the Bull
    • The Hare and the Hound
    • The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse
    • The Lion and the Bull
    • The Wolf, the Fox, and the Ape
    • The Eagle and the Cocks
    • The Escaped Jackdaw
    • The Farmer and the Fox
    • Venus and the Cat
    • The Crow and the Swan
    • The Stag With One Eye
    • The Fly and the Draught-Mule
    • The Cock and the Jewel
    • The Wolf and the Shepherd
    • The Farmer and the Stork
    • The Charger and the Miller
    • The Grasshopper and the Owl
    • The Grasshopper and the Ants
    • The Farmer and the Viper
    • The Two Frogs
    • The Cobbler Turned Doctor
    • The Ass, the Cock, and the Lion
    • The Belly and the Members
    • The Bald Man and the Fly
    • The Ass and the Wolf
    • The Monkey and the Camel
    • The Sick Man and the Doctor
    • The Travellers and the Plane-Tree
    • The Flea and the Ox
    • The Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat
    • The Man and His Two Sweethearts
    • The Eagle, the Jackdaw, and the Shepherd
    • The Wolf and the Boy
    • The Miller, His Son, and Their Ass
    • The Stag and the Vine
    • The Lamb Chased by a Wolf
    • The Archer and the Lion
    • The Wolf and the Goat
    • The Sick Stag
    • The Ass and the Mule
    • Brother and Sister
    • The Heifer and the Ox
    • The Kingdom of the Lion
    • The Ass and His Driver
    • The Lion and the Hare
    • The Wolves and the Dogs
    • The Bull and the Calf
    • The Trees and the Axe
    • The Astronomer
    • The Labourer and the Snake
    • The Cage-Bird and the Bat
    • The Ass and His Purchaser
    • The Kid and the Wolf
    • The Debtor and His Sow
    • The Bald Huntsman
    • The Herdsman and the Lost Bull
    • The Mule
    • The Hound and the Fox
    • The Father and His Daughters
    • The Thief and the Innkeeper
    • The Pack-Ass and the Wild Ass
    • The Ass and His Masters
    • The Pack-Ass, the Wild Ass, and the Lion
    • The Ant
    • The Frogs and the Well
    • The Crab and the Fox
    • The Fox and the Grasshopper
    • The Farmer, His Boy, and the Rooks
    • The Ass and the Dog
    • The Ass Carrying the Image
    • The Athenian and the Theban
    • The Goatherd and the Goat
    • The Sheep and the Dog
    • The Shepherd and the Wolf
    • The Lion, Jupiter, and the Elephant
    • The Pig and the Sheep
    • The Gardener and His Dog
    • The Rivers and the Sea
    • The Lion in Love
    • The Bee-Keeper
    • The Wolf and the Horse
    • The Bat, the Bramble, and the Seagull
    • The Dog and the Wolf
    • The Wasp and the Snake
    • The Eagle and the Beetle
    • The Fowler and the Lark
    • The Fisherman Piping
    • The Weasel and the Man
    • The Ploughman, the Ass, and the Ox
    • Demades and His Fable
    • The Monkey and the Dolphin
    • The Crow and the Snake
    • The Dogs and the Fox
    • The Nightingale and the Hawk
    • The Rose and the Amaranth
    • The Man, the Horse, the Ox, and the Dog
    • The Wolves, the Sheep, and the Ram
    • The Swan
    • The Snake and Jupiter
    • The Wolf and His Shadow
    • The Ploughman and the Wolf
    • Mercury and the Man Bitten By an Ant
    • The Wily Lion
    • The Parrot and the Cat
    • The Stag and the Lion
    • The Impostor
    • The Dogs and the Hides
    • The Lion, the Fox, and the Ass
    • The Fowler, the Partridge, and the Cock
    • The Gnat and the Lion
    • The Farmer and His Dogs
    • The Eagle and the Fox
    • The Butcher and His Customers
    • Hercules and Minerva
    • The Fox Who Served a Lion
    • The Quack Doctor
    • The Lion, the Wolf, and the Fox
    • Hercules and Plutus
    • The Fox and the Leopard
    • The Fox and the Hedgehog
    • The Crow and the Raven
    • The Witch
    • The Old Man and Death
    • The Miser
    • The Foxes and the River
    • The Horse and the Stag
    • The Fox and the Bramble
    • The Fox and the Snake
    • The Lion, the Fox, and the Stag
    • The Man Who Lost His Spade
    • The Partridge and the Fowler
    • The Runaway Slave
    • The Hunter and the Woodman
    • The Serpent and the Eagle
    • The Rogue and the Oracle
    • The Horse and the Ass
    • The Dog Chasing a Wolf
    • Grief and His Due
    • The Hawk, the Kite, and the Pigeons
    • The Woman and the Farmer
    • Prometheus and the Making of Man
    • The Swallow and the Crow
    • The Hunter and the Horseman
    • The Goatherd and the Wild Goats
    • The Nightingale and the Swallow
    • The Traveller and Fortune
  • Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales
    • Title Page
    • THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES
    • THE SWINEHERD
    • THE REAL PRINCESS
    • THE SHOES OF FORTUNE
    • THE FIR TREE
    • THE SNOW QUEEN
    • THE LEAP-FROG
    • THE ELDERBUSH
    • THE BELL
    • THE OLD HOUSE
    • THE HAPPY FAMILY
    • THE STORY OF A MOTHER
    • THE FALSE COLLAR
    • THE SHADOW
    • THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL
    • THE DREAM OF LITTLE TUK
    • THE NAUGHTY BOY
    • THE RED SHOES
  • Grimm’s Fairy Tales
    • Title Page
    • The Golden Bird
    • Hans in Luck
    • Jorinda and Jorindel
    • The Travelling Musicians
    • Old Sultan
    • The Straw, The Coal, and The Bean
    • Briar Rose
    • The Dog and The Sparrow
    • The Twelve Dancing Princesses
    • The Fisherman and His Wife
    • The Willow-Wren and The Bear
    • The Frog-Prince
    • Cat and Mouse in Partnership
    • The Goose-Girl
    • The Adventures of Chanticleer and Partlet
    • Rapunzel
    • Fundevogel
    • The Valiant Little Tailor
    • Hansel and Gretel
    • The Mouse, The Bird, and The Sausage
    • Mother Holle
    • Little Red-Cap [Little Red Riding Hood]
    • The Robber Bridegroom
    • Tom Thumb
    • Rumpelstiltskin
    • Clever Gretel
    • The Old Man and His Grandson
    • The Little Peasant
    • Frederick and Catherine
    • Sweetheart Roland
    • Snowdrop
    • The Pink
    • Clever Elsie
    • The Miser in The Bush
    • Ashputtel
    • The White Snake
    • The Wolf and The Seven Little Kids
    • The Queen Bee
    • The Elves and The Shoemaker
    • The Juniper-Tree
    • The Turnip
    • Clever Hans
    • The Three Languages
    • The Fox and The Cat
    • The Four Clever Brothers
    • Lily and The Lion
    • The Fox and The Horse
    • The Blue Light
    • The Raven
    • The Golden Goose
    • The Water of Life
    • The Twelve Huntsmen
    • The King of The Golden Mountain
    • Doctor Knowall
    • The Seven Ravens
    • The Wedding of Mrs Fox
    • The Salad
    • The Story of The Youth Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was
    • King Grisly-Beard
    • Iron Hans
    • Cat-Skin
    • Snow-White and Rose-Red
  • The Blue Fairy Book
    • Title Page
    • THE BRONZE RING
    • PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
    • EAST OF THE SUN AND WEST OF THE MOON
    • THE YELLOW DWARF
    • LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD
    • THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOOD
    • CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER
    • ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP
    • THE TALE OF A YOUTH WHO SET OUT TO LEARN WHAT FEAR WAS
    • RUMPELSTILTZKIN
    • BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
    • THE MASTER-MAID
    • WHY THE SEA IS SALT
    • THE MASTER CAT; OR, PUSS IN BOOTS
    • FELICIA AND THE POT OF PINKS
    • THE WHITE CAT
    • THE WATER-LILY. THE GOLD-SPINNERS
    • THE TERRIBLE HEAD
    • THE STORY OF PRETTY GOLDILOCKS
    • THE HISTORY OF WHITTINGTON
    • THE WONDERFUL SHEEP
    • LITTLE THUMB
    • THE FORTY THIEVES
    • HANSEL AND GRETTEL
    • SNOW-WHITE AND ROSE-RED
    • THE GOOSE-GIRL
    • TOADS AND DIAMONDS
    • PRINCE DARLING
    • BLUE BEARD
    • TRUSTY JOHN
    • THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR
    • A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT
    • THE PRINCESS ON THE GLASS HILL
    • THE STORY OF PRINCE AHMED AND THE FAIRY PARIBANOU
    • THE HISTORY OF JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
    • THE BLACK BULL OF NORROWAY
    • THE RED ETIN
  • About the Authors

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