The Bicycle Thief

The Bicycle Thief

Director: Vittorio De Sica Cast: Lamberto Maggiorani, Lianella Carell, Enzo Staiola

Blu-ray (Special Edition / Wide Screen / Restored / Subtitled)

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Overview

This landmark Italian neorealist drama became one of the best-known and most widely acclaimed European movies, including a special Academy Award as "most outstanding foreign film" seven years before that Oscar category existed. Written primarily by neorealist pioneer Cesare Zavattini and directed by Vittorio DeSica, also one of the movement's main forces, the movie featured all the hallmarks of the neorealist style: a simple story about the lives of ordinary people, outdoor shooting and lighting, non-actors mixed together with actors, and a focus on social problems in the aftermath of World War II. Lamberto Maggiorani plays Antonio, an unemployed man who finds a coveted job that requires a bicycle. When it is stolen on his first day of work, Antonio and his young son Bruno (Enzo Staiola) begin a frantic search, learning valuable lessons along the way. The movie focuses on both the relationship between the father and the son and the larger framework of poverty and unemployment in postwar Italy. As in such other classic films as Shoeshine (1946), Umberto D. (1952), and his late masterpiece The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1971), DeSica focuses on the ordinary details of ordinary lives as a way to dramatize wider social issues. As a result, The Bicycle Thief works as a sentimental study of a father and son, a historical document, a social statement, and a record of one of the century's most influential film movements.

Product Details

Release Date: 03/29/2016
UPC: 0715515106719
Original Release: 1948
Rating: NR
Source: Criterion
Region Code: A
Presentation: [Wide Screen]
Time: 1:29:00
Sales rank: 5,166

Special Features

Working with De Sica, a collection of interviews with screenwriter Suso Cecchi d'Amico, actor Enzo Staiola and film scholar Callisto Cosulich Life as It Is, a program on the history of Italian neorealism, featuring scholar Mark Shiel Documentary from 2003 on screenwriter and longtime Vittorio De Sica collaborator Cesare Zavattini, directed by Carl Lizzani Optional English-dubbed soundtrack

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Lamberto Maggiorani Antonio Ricci
Lianella Carell Maria Ricci
Enzo Staiola Bruno Ricci
Elena Altieri The Lady
Vittorio Antonucci The Thief
Gino Saltamerenda Bajocco
Michele Sakara Actor
Fausto Guerzoni Amateur Actor
Nando Bruno Actor
Memmo Carotenuto Actor
Umberto Spadaro Actor

Technical Credits
Vittorio De Sica Director,Producer,Screenwriter
O. Biancoli Screenwriter
Alessandro Cicognini Score Composer
Suso Cecchi D'Amico Screenwriter
Adolfo Franci Screenwriter
Carlo Montuori Cinematographer
Eraldo Da Roma Editor
Antonio Traverso Art Director
Cesare Zavattini Screenwriter

Customer Reviews

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The Bicycle Thief 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
vmwrites More than 1 year ago
For any cinemphile who wants to learn more about Italian Neorealism, I consider the Absolute Essentials to include Bicycle Thieves, Umberto D, and La Strada. For those unfamiliar with this genre, the Italian Neorealist films depicted the social and economic poverty of the period after WW2, in a country whose administrative infrastructure was being reconstructed, whose people were recovering from the destruction of war, and whose spirit was muddied by one disappointment after another. Bicycle Thieves presents a panorama of life in Italy at a critical juncture. And what makes this film - and others like it - so poingnant and so moving is the on-location cinemtography, the genuine and sometimes brutal look at poverty, and the use of non-actors. This is an absolute MUST for any cinema collection. And for those who are willing to venture into Italian Neorealism, there are the Japanese Postwar films that go hand in hand with their Italian counterparts. No film collection would be complete without these.
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